Kawagoe festival floats

The mikoshi, or portable shrine, is a favourite of most Japanese festivals, but at the one in Kawagoe, the lifting of such far from light objects is instead forfeited for unfeasibly large floats; heavy and hulking monsters which, when manoeuvred around the city’s relatively narrow streets, are quite a spectacle to say the least.

Kawagoe festival

Allowing the older fellas who lead them to feel understandably important,

Kawagoe festival

and proud.

Kawagoe festival

Although those doing the pushing and pulling all day are perhaps justified in feeling a little bit peeved.

Kawagoe festival

But on the whole it’s a chance for participants of all ages to have a tremendous amount of fun in traditional togs,

Kawagoe festival

as well as timidly tackling a little toddle around town.

Kawagoe festival

Long abandoned holiday home

When heading out to visit a haikyo/abandoned building, the biggest worries (for me at least) are whether it’ll still be there, and even if it is, whether we’ll be able to find it. So, with this in mind, coming across a long left lodging along the way is a real bonus, especially as it possibly hasn’t been pictured before, or at the very least posted in a publication.

And whilst this particular find wasn’t as filled with furniture and pointers to the past like some places, despite the gloriously green if overgrown front garden,

Japanese abandoned building

it still rather gloomily gave hints about possible fun,

Japanese abandoned building

obvious failings,

Japanese abandoned building

and even the future.

Japanese abandoned building